Hello to all our visitors, 

If  you think you can offer a Leonberger a temporary, long term or short term foster home, we would love to hear from you. 

Please send us an email at lcgbwelfare@aol.co.uk and request a potential foster carers questionairre. 

Many thanks 

LCGB Rescue and Welfare 

 

LEONBERGER RESCUE AND WELFARE:

OFFICIAL RESCUE FOR THE LEONBERGER CLUB OF GREAT BRITAIN BREED CLUB 

We understand how difficult it is to give up your beloved Leonberger, but sometimes it is the only decision a Leo owner can make. If you are in a situation where you are finding it difficult to cope with your Leonberger or your home circumstances have changed, we can help you through the painful process of rehoming.  We will do everything in our power to make it as stress free as possible.

After you have surrendered your Leonberger, we will find the very best home for your beloved dog and will keep track of him/her to ensure that they are receiving the very best care. 

Our process is to find out the reason for the dog coming into rescue and obtain the dog¹s full history, including any health information. If lack of training or easily dealt with behaviour problems are the cause, and if the owner is willing, we attempt to help the owner keep the dog by offering training suggestions and resources.

If the dog¹s behaviour is too much for the owner or the owner is not willing or able to work with the dog, then one of a few things may happen. If the dog lives close enough to one of our volunteers experienced enough to do a basic evaluation then we will arrange a visit to your home to interact with and assess the dog. We may also use a qualified behaviourist to temperament test and assess and advise us of the choices available. Our dedicated welfare and rescue team are here to help and advise.

Any contact or discussions with members of our Rescue and Welfare team are in the strictest of confidence. We will not judge your reasons for needing to rehome your dog as we know this is a hard decision for any dog owner to make. 

For any advice or help needed with your Leonberger please contact one of our team, our contact details are shown on our Contact us page on this website.

LCGB Rescue & Welfare team 

 

You are visitor number: 21244

Online fun dog show  


 *** OUR ONLINE FUN DOG SHOW ON FACEBOOK IS NOW OPEN TO ENTRIES *** 

The fun classes FOR ALL BREEDS (not just leonbergers) are as follows: 

Veteran                
Rainbow Bridge  
Cutest All breed puppy  
Best action shot  
Dirtiest dog 
Fancy dress 
Best rescue  
Prettiest all breed female  
Most handsome all breed male 
Cutest Leonberger baby puppy (aged up to 6 months - male and female)  

Pedigree classes for Leonbergers (There will be separate classes for Male and Female entries):-      

Puppy (6 - 12 months) 
Junior (12 - 18 months)  
Open  
Veteran 7 yrs+ 

Entries £2 per entry, 3 entries for £5 and 5 entries for £8 but there is no maximum limit for entries. Enter as many classes as you like with one photo per dog.  

** ALL PROCEEDS WILL GO TO LCGB RESCUE AND WELFARE FUND ** 

Best of luck to you all 🤞 and we look forward to seeing all your wonderful photos 

- LCGB Rescue and Welfare team -

Fundraising and donations  

We would like to give a warm welcome to our new website visitors and facebook group members and a thank you to everyone for your support. 

Us as a team are asking for your help. 
We have never really asked for donations or financial assistance from you but times are changing and we are seeing more special Leo's and complicated cases coming into our care. 

These more special dogs are requiring dedicated input from us as a team our foster carers, and our team behaviourist. 

LCGB Rescue and Welfare team give up their time on a voluntary basis and there is lots going on behind the scenes, including rehabilitation and training and home visits by our behaviourist with training and behavioural plans for each specific dog being put in to place for new Leo owners or those families requesting help with their beloved leonberger. 

We know it is a big ask but we are appealing to you all that if possible you could be so kind to give a small donation to our rescue and welfare fund to be able to continue to provide this much needed care, and assist us to continue to provide these special dogs and their families with the support they need. 

If you feel you could make a donation no matter how small we have a newly set up PayPal account. 
Please send your donations to: 
lcgbwelfare@aol.co.uk 

Don't forget to choose the friends and family option for your donation so fees aren't deducted. 

Please also keep an eye out on our Facebook group and website for up and coming fundraising events.  

Once again thank you to you all for your support and continued interaction with our group. We hope you continue to enjoy and share our posts and informative information. 

Kind regards 

LCGB Rescue and Welfare team

Stolen dogs - Please be vigilant  

** REPORTS OF STOLEN DOGS ** 

Hedingham, Bulmer, Colne and surrounding areas in Essex.  

Please be vigilant as there are a few local reports of dogs being "STOLEN" locally around the Hedingham and nearby areas in Essex and Suffolk.  

Due to this, please do not to leave your dogs unattended in the garden, ensure they are wearing a collar, ID tag and that their microchip details are up to date. If your dog is not micripchipped please get this done ASAP.  

The trend seems to be multiple dog households with gun dog and working type breeds but all dog owners must be extra vigilant. 

Please also notify 111 if you see drones being used over residential properties or any suspicious people or vehicles in your area.  

You can also register on DogLost - those registered will receive alerts when dogs are Missing, Stolen or Found in your area. It sends notifications and posters out to pet professionals like, groomers, dog walkers and vets. 

There have been 32 cocker spaniels stolen in East Angila since last month (NOT including the ones locally) 

PLEASE STAY VIGILANT

Warning to dog owners in Carlisle  

A Vet has urged dog owners and walkers to be  vigilant after treating a dog who had become unwell after eating from a bag of rotten meat. 
With reports of similar events happening in recent days. 

A vet at Border Vets in Longtown and Eden Veterinary Practice in Carlisle, has spoken out after carrying out an emergency procedure on a dog last Sunday. 

She has since become more concerned as reports of identical cases have surfaced on social media. 

They don’t want to scare people, but they wanted to make people aware that this is happening.  

The owner of the dog treated at the vets explained that she found her Labrador George had eaten from a bag of rotten meat after darting away from her while on a walk. 

She phoned her son and he warned her that other similar stories had been circulating on social media. 

She called the emergency vet and took him there straight away. The vet gave him an injection to make him vomit 

The police were contacted but they said they couldn't do anything. 

A Cumbria Police spokeswoman said: 
“We have been contacted by people asking for advice on this matter and we have received at least one call raising concerns that a dog may have eaten decomposed meat. 

However, we can confirm there have been no calls to police to say that a dog has died or fallen ill as a direct result of eating poisoned meat in city parks. There has been no confirmation that poison has been placed anywhere. 

A Cotehill resident had an similar experience on Saturday afternoon. 

Taking his Labrador, Belle, for a walk through the nearby High Stand woods her owner was concerned to discover Belle returning to him with a plastic bag in her mouth containing cubes of chicken. 

Belle was taken straight to the vets and they made her vomit. Thankfully, Belle appears not to have suffered any lasting effects. 

The similarity to other cases makes it more possible that is 100 per cent deliberate. 

If your dog becomes unwell after a walk or you think they may have been poisoned take them to your vet straight away. Call them beforehand if possible so they are waiting your arrival. 

Also report to the police on 101 

Photo: George, who became unwell after eating from a bag of rotten meat near Rickerby Park, Carlisle (Cumberland news)

Autumn - Conkers  

Autumn is here and a gentle reminder for you all.  

Please keep your four legged friends  away from conkers as they're toxic to dogs , however, serious cases of illness are rare. 

Conkers contain a chemical called aesculin – found in all parts of the horse chestnut tree, including the leaves – which is  highly poisonous to dogs if chewed and eaten.  

Although fatalities in cases where dogs have consumed conkers are rare, we still advised you to be cautious 

They can vomit, collapse, have diarrhoea and go into toxic shock & they can also cause blockages in your pet's stomach. . Signs of illness usually arise after a couple of days but dogs can show signs of being poisoned within one to six hours of consuming the conkers, But if you think your pet has eaten a conker, contact your vet immediately!!

Homechecks for forever homes  

Whenever possible JoJo and Russ from our rescue and welfare team will take one or both of their Leo's with them when doing a homecheck so a family can get an idea of what it would be like to have a Leo or 2 in their home, especially if they haven't been owned by a Leonberger before.  

Being a typical Leo, Karoo made himself at home, and was happily playing with their friends dog. His Leo traits were welcomed with open arms by this lovely family.... Piper the Cavapoo is under there somewhere ?  

Hopefully one day they will be able to welcome a Leonberger into their home 

*permission was given to use these photos by the family

Blue-green algae  

*** BLUE-GREEN ALGAE *** 

We love to see our dogs having fun in lakes and rivers and it's the perfect way for them to cool off in the summer, but please be aware of the dangers of some algae that may be found in our waters.  

Blue-green algae can be toxic to dogs. 
Call your vet immediately if you suspect poisoning. 
Do not let your dog drink from or swim in water containing blue-green algae.  

Sadly, exposure to toxic blue-green algae is often fatal, and can also cause long term health problems in dogs that survive after drinking or swimming in algae-contaminated water.  

If your dog shows any of the following signs after drinking from, or swimming or paddling in water, contact your vet immediately and tell them you are concerned about blue-green algae: 

Vomiting/being sick 
Diarrhoea 
Seizures/fitting 
Weakness/collapse/unconsciousness 
Disorientation/confusion 
Drooling 
Breathing difficulties 

Blue-green algae poisoning often eventually causes fatal liver failure. 

IS BLUE-GREEN ALGAE A HEALTH RISK TO HUMANS? 

Yes, blue-green algae can cause skin rashes, sickness, stomach pains, fever and headaches in humans. There have been some reports of more serious illnesses including liver and brain damage. Children are at greater risk than adults. 

If you think you have spotted blue-green algae in water and cannot see any signage, report it to the Environment Agency who can investigate. 

IF IN DOUBT STAY OUT OF THE WATER

HEATSTROKE : Keep your dogs cool ?  

*** PLEASE READ AND SHARE *** 

The importance of not leaving dogs in cars and also the prevention of heatstroke and knowing the signs, symptoms and treatment. 

Keep your dogs cool ? 

With all this lovely hot weather at the moment we thought it would be an idea to talk about the signs and treatment for heatstroke: 

*** PLEASE DO NOT LEAVE DOGS IN CARS AND KEEP THEM OUT OF THE SUN DURING THE HOTTEST PART OF THE DAY *** 

Warning signs of heatstroke: 
Is the dog panting heavily?   
Is the dog drooling excessively?   
Does the dog appear lethargic, drowsy or uncoordinated?   
Is the dog collapsed or vomiting? 
(Dogs can also lose control of their bowels) 
Check for a change in colour of their gums: 
Red or purple gums are a symptom of heatstroke 
Pale or white gums are a sign of shock.  

What is ‘heatstroke’? 
If dogs are too hot and are unable to reduce their body temperature by panting, they will develop heatstroke which can prove fatal.  

Some types and breeds of dog are more prone to heatstroke, like very young dogs or old dogs or those with thick, heavy coats or dogs with very short flat faces like bulldog and pug breeds. Dogs with certain illnesses or diseases or on some types of medication are also more at risk. 

Dogs suffering from heatstroke urgently need to have their body temperature lowered gradually. 

Move your dog to a cool/shaded area.   
Immediately douse the dog with cool (not cold) water, to avoid shock. If possible, you can also use wet towels or place him/her in the breeze of a fan.   
Allow the dog to drink small amounts of cool water.   
Continue to douse the dog with cool water until his/her breathing starts to settle but never so much that he/she begins to shiver. 
If you have access to cold or frozen items, eg frozen peas or ice pack, wrap the item in a towel and place it in the dogs groin but never place ice or frozen items directly on to the skin.  

On travelling to the vet if your dog is unconscious and is showing signs and symptoms of shock, sit with your dog laying on its side with his/her hind legs over your knees so his/her head is lower than his bottom so the blood can be directed back to his/her heart and brain and vital organs.  

Take your dog to the nearest vet as a matter of urgency, if it is possible for you to ring ahead to prepare the vet for your arrival then that is even better as they will be ready and waiting to administer life saving treatment for your beloved fur baby. 

* Walk your dogs during the coolest part of the day, early morning or late evening and keep your animals out of the heat during the hottest parts of the day. 

* Do not walk dogs on hot pavements or roads as this can cause burn injuries to their paws. 

* If you have astroturf or fake grass, check to see if it gets hot under foot. Some grades of astroturf can become hot.  

* Keep dogs cool, using a fan, keep rooms ventilated and cool mats are a good idea.  

*** DOGS LEFT IN CARS *** 

If you find a dog or animal that is left in a vehicle that has no ventilation or access to water call 999 and ask for police attendance. If you feel the dogs' life is in immediate danger, and feel immediate removal of the dog from the vehicle is necessary, take a photo of the car, registration number, and if possible evidence of the outside temperature at the time.  

Make sure you tell the police what you intend to do and why. Take pictures or videos of the dog and the names and numbers of witnesses to the incident. The law states that you have a lawful excuse to commit damage if you believe that the owner of the property that you damage would consent to the damage if they knew the circumstances (section 5(2)(a) Criminal Damage Act 1971). 

Please feel free to share 

Kindest regards  
LCGB Welfare team

WARNING - To all dog owners and walkers in the Staffordshire area  

*** WARNING TO ALL DOG OWNERS AND WALKERS IN THE BURSLEM/STOKE ON TRENT/STAFFORDSHIRE AREA *** 

Warning to dog owners as black puddings stuffed with razor blades, glass and tablets are found in Stoke-on-Trent 

Police are investigating after photos emerged on social media today of the meat substance concealing dangerous items in Burslem. 

At least two black puddings have been discovered in the Camoys Road area, but there could be more. 

It is not yet known if any dogs have been harmed. 

One of the black puddings was found near a bin.  

These reports come after tennis balls with blades concealed inside were found at  Lyme Park, near Stockport. 

Rat poison was also discovered at Meir Aerodrome, off Normacot Grange Road - a popular dog-walking spot. 

In a warning Lime Tree Vets said: "We have been informed today by a member of the public that a substance looking like rat poison has been spotted on Meir Aerodrome. 

"Whilst rat poison in the UK is typically bright colours, we would highly recommend being extra vigilant when walking your pet around this area. 

"The local council and police have been made aware. The location on the Aerodrome of this finding is the grass verge adjacent to the entrance of the fields on Normacot Grange Road – the lady has removed what she saw but this is not to say there is any more lying around. 

To report any suspicious items, call Staffordshire Police on 101. 

Rainbow bridge - Troy 

It is with the heaviest of hearts that we are writing this tribute to a very special boy Troy who we rehomed just last March. Sadly Troy has been taken far too soon due to osteosarcoma. We would like to thank his amazing Mum Rebecca for giving him the most fabulous home we could have asked for. He was so very happy, loved and spoilt and he got to go on lovely adventures and holidays by the sea. His previous family had the peace of mind knowing that he lived his last year with love and comfort. Run free over at rainbow bridge gorgeous boy and our thoughts are with Rebecca and also her family ? ?