LEONBERGER RESCUE AND WELFARE:

OFFICIAL RESCUE FOR THE LEONBERGER CLUB OF GREAT BRITAIN BREED CLUB 

We understand how difficult it is to give up your beloved Leonberger, but sometimes it is the only decision a Leo owner can make. If you are in a situation where you are finding it difficult to cope with your Leonberger or your home circumstances have changed, we can help you through the painful process of rehoming.  We will do everything in our power to make it as stress free as possible.

After you have surrendered your Leonberger, we will find the very best home for your beloved dog and will keep track of him/her to ensure that they are receiving the very best care. 

Our process is to find out the reason for the dog coming into rescue and obtain the dog¹s full history, including any health information. If lack of training or easily dealt with behaviour problems are the cause, and if the owner is willing, we attempt to help the owner keep the dog by offering training suggestions and resources.

If the dog¹s behaviour is too much for the owner or the owner is not willing or able to work with the dog, then one of a few things may happen. If the dog lives close enough to one of our volunteers experienced enough to do a basic evaluation then we will arrange a visit to your home to interact with and assess the dog. We may also use a qualified behaviourist to temperament test and assess and advise us of the choices available. Our dedicated welfare and rescue team are here to help and advise.

Any contact or discussions with members of our Rescue and Welfare team are in the strictest of confidence. We will not judge your reasons for needing to rehome your dog as we know this is a hard decision for any dog owner to make. 

For any advice or help needed with your Leonberger please contact one of our team, our contact details are shown on our Contact us page on this website.

LCGB Rescue & Welfare team 

 

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  • Anonymous

    Anonymous Filmer

    We adopted our first Leo (Mrs Miggins) in 2013. She was one of many rescued from a puppy farm and taken to the RSPCA. She was in a terrible condition , chronic ear infection and still had her stitches in from being space. It took a while for her to get used to being indoors/go for a walk/enjoy treats etc but she eventually did and became the most wonderful new member to our doggy family. After one year we decided she might like a friend so we rang LCGB to see if you had any Leo’s that needed a home. Alison put me directly in touch with someone who needed a home for their 6 year old male -and so we got George. Sadly we lost Mrs Miggins in 2015 bit, I believe she has a comfortable and loving 2 years with us. George carried on until this October when, at the age of 10, we had to say goodbye. We have had many dogs, of various breeds, be part of our family and it has certainly been an absolute privilege to share our lives with Leonbergers. - Judy

    We adopted our first Leo (Mrs Miggins) in 2013. She was one of many rescued from a puppy farm and taken to the RSPCA. She was in a terrible condition , chronic ear infection and still had her stitches in from being space. It took a while for her to get used to being indoors/go for a walk/enjoy treats etc but she eventually did and became the most wonderful new member to our doggy family. After one year we decided she might like a friend so we rang LCGB to see if you had any Leo’s that needed a home. Alison put me directly in touch with someone who needed a home for their 6 year old male -and so we got George. Sadly we lost Mrs Miggins in 2015 bit, I believe she has a comfortable and loving 2 years with us. George carried on until this October when, at the age of 10, we had to say goodbye. We have had many dogs, of various breeds, be part of our family and it has certainly been an absolute privilege to share our lives with Leonbergers. - Judy

Easter eggs 

*** REMEMBER THIS EASTER THAT CHOCOLATE AND OTHER EASTER TREATS CAN BE HARMFUL TO DOGS *** 

Easter eggs 

Chocolate contains a substance called theobromine, which is extremely harmful to dogs as they struggle to metabolise it, so it builds up in their bodies to toxic levels. 

If a dog is suffering from chocolate poisoning, the symptoms they may display may include hyperactivity, vomiting, diarrhoea and fits. 

The first two hours after your dog has eaten chocolate can be vital for your pet’s recovery, so if your pet has eaten any chocolate or similar treats containing cocoa, it’s essential to call a vet immediately. The sooner your dog is seen and treated the better.  

* Raisins, grapes, sultanas and currants can cause kidney failure in dogs. So keep an eye on your hot cross buns  

* Some plants and bulbs, e.g daffodils are also toxic to dogs if eaten. 

The gorgeous Easter Bunnyberger is Memphis

Reports of Leishmaniasis  

*** PLEASE READ AND SHARE *** 

REPORTED CASES OF LEISHMANIASIS IN HERTFORDSHIRE AND ESSEX  

Dog owners in the UK warned after their pet dies of a bug that can infect humans 

A shih tzu in HERTFORDSHIRE has sadly died from the disease. 

Experts have warned that it can infect humans. It comes following the death of a pet shih tzu in Hertfordshire which died after catching the infection. 
The disease is Leishmaniasis and is carried by female sand flies, which transmit the disease with their bite. It can be passed between dogs when an infected animal bites or wounds another. It is also known to be a zoonotic disease, meaning it can be passed from animal to human. 
Until now, it was commonly found in Europe but unheard of in the UK. Vets are raising awareness and warning pet owners to be on the alert for symptoms. 

The three year old shih tzu that died had been with his owners since he was a puppy, and had shown no signs of the symptoms. But vets suspected dog-to-dog transmission of the disease, and another dog in the household had been put down six months earlier due to developing a severe case of Leishmaniasis. This is the first reported case of Leishmaniasis in the UK in a dog without a history of travel to an endemic area. 
All dog owners must be aware of the bug, and the signs their dog could have it, as increased travel and importation of dogs meant increased risk. 

Veterinary experts have said “Leishmania-infected dogs may present an infection risk to other dogs, even in the absence of natural vectors, as direct transmission between dogs is possible.” 

A FURTHER CASE WAS REPORTED  
A fully vaccinated English pointer – has also been diagnosed with the infection in ESSEX. The dog had never travelled outside of the county, however its owners had travelled to Spain last summer. The dog had never been in contact with another infected dog, so it is believed that the owners may have accidentally brought back sand flies from their holiday in their luggage or clothing. 

The symptoms to watch out for include: 

Severe weight loss 
Loss of appetite 
Diarrhoea 
Tarry faeces 
Vomiting 
Nose bleeds 
Exercise intolerance 
Scaling on the skin 
Alopecia Nodules on the skin surface 
Ulcers 
Long or brittle nails 
Painful joints 
Signs of renal failure – excessive peeing, thirst and vomiting 
Emaciation 

TRANSMISSION TO HUMANS:: 

Leishmaniasis can infect humans in three different forms, however it is rare in this part of the world. Most cases have occurred in Brazil, East Africa and South East Asia. The most lethal is visceral leishmaniasis, which is fatal in 95 per cent of cases and causes bouts of fever, weight loss and anaemia. The most common form in humans is cutaneous leishmaniasis and causes skin lesions and ulcers.

Warning - Cheshunt, Hertfordshire  

*****WARNING***** 
For those in the Cheshunt area. It has been advised that a large quantity of rat poison has been sprinkled on the green, on The Rosedale, Cheshunt - the park area near Granby Park Road - The council will be clearing asap. Please avoid walking your dogs and children in the area. If you think your dog may have eaten something whilst in the area contact Vets for advice as soon as possible. (Source providing this information is Highfields Vets Broxbourne).